The Link Between Poor Nutrition and Headaches

The Link Between Poor Nutrition and Headaches

Usually, headaches are minor problems, short periods of discomfort with no serious medical reason behind them. Migraines can be more disruptive, as can chronic headaches. About 1 in 5 people with headache issues may have also food sensitivity issues that contribute to their episodes. 

Headaches and diet can have several connections. Certain foods can trigger migraines, and nutritional deficiencies may also be behind your head pain. When you’re suffering from more than the occasional headache, consider a visit to Westside Pain Specialists to investigate ways to ease the problem. 

When it comes to poor nutrition, here are some issues you may want to discuss with Dr. James Nassiri and his team. 

Dehydration

Perhaps one of the most common reasons you’re having headaches is a lack of fluids. If you regularly go hours without drinking anything, it might be contributing to headaches. 

For example, if you start the day drinking coffee before switching to caffeinated sodas, the cumulative diuretic effect could mean you’re losing more fluids than you expect, and dehydration may be building. 

While each person’s fluid needs are different, the oft-quoted level of eight 8-ounce glasses of water spread through the day is a great place to start if you want to rule out dehydration as a reason behind your headaches. Give it a week and see if your pain eases up. 

Vitamin D

If you’re not getting enough vitamin D, the sunlight vitamin, you may suffer headaches more days per month than you need to, particularly if you’re a migraine sufferer. 

Vitamin D is present in foods, it can be taken as a supplement, and exposure to sunshine helps your body synthesize this hormone that balances calcium levels and influences the immune system. 

Vitamin D deficiency can contribute to headaches, but beware of overloading on it, since that creates other health issues. Adults up to the age of 70 should have about 600 international units (IU) per day, with older adults requiring 800 IUs. 

B vitamins

All B vitamins play a role in headache prevention since they support the nervous system in general. Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) can contribute to migraines when it’s missing from your diet in sufficient quantities. In fact, B2 supplements are sometimes prescribed to reduce the impact of migraines. 

Electrolytes

In hot or strenuous conditions where you sweat profusely, hydration is your priority, of course. However, when you sweat, you’re also losing electrolytes, most importantly sodium and magnesium, where headaches are concerned. 

Low levels of these two electrolytes could trigger headaches, so in demanding conditions, add an occasional electrolyte beverage to offset your losses. 

Visit Westside Pain Specialists in Beverly Hills or Rancho Cucamonga, California, when you have recurring or problem headaches. 

Dr. Nassiri can evaluate your condition, and if he suspects dietary deficiencies are playing a role, he may recommend IV vitamin therapy as a treatment. Call the most convenient office to book your consultation now. 

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